Now homeowners allowed prepay only First Installment for next year. This is money saving program for home owners who pay off their property. Full year prepayment allowed Itemize more awry second year.

The County Board has seen fit not to even consider reversing the ban on Metal Detecting on Forest Preserve property. There are many Metal Detecting Associations throughout the State. There are many Forest Preserve Districts that allow these organization members to Metal Detect by special permits. The members not only cause no damage to land, but remove and properly discard any trash. Why does the Cook County Board consider the issuance of these association members yearly permits for a nominal fee. Besides the revenue, this would be a plus to keep trash under control. Members abide by strict guidelines, one of them being any area dug will be returned to its original state with no damage or sign of any activity

If you are going to stick a tax on a private used vehicle purchase, you ought to charge the tax upon vehicle registration, rather than surprise the buyer with a hefty tax bill four months later. If you can't get the state (DMV) to facilitate this, then you should not have enacted the tax without this minimal consideration for Cook County residents.

This idea will eliminate some of the abandon property and as well eliminate paying out funds to private property owners. So what you is take all the abandon buildings and houses or forclosed properties and rent them to people on section 8. That why you will eliminate paying a private home owner and whatever the co-pay is it goes to the county. Then if the tent decides to buy they can buy it and all the copay monies can be added to sale... This idea will help both the city and county save money and will also cut on vacant property. This will also keep revenue with in the county..

I have a suggestion that could save $700,000 or more.  All you would have to do is enforce an existing ordinance. 

The ordinance requires that certain 6b and other property tax incentive holders who fail to file a triennial report shall lose the incentive tax break for the triennial period.  However, the Assessor is not enforcing the ordinance. I have learned through FOIA that about 10% of such reports are missing for the 2007 ands 2010 triennial years for Schaumburg township.  I believe the nonfiling problem is county wide and the lax non-enforcement is county wide.

If the non-filing rate was 10% across the 1543 6bs in the County and the Assessor were to enforce the penalty, the County would recoup about $12,000,000 in EAV for the 2011 tax year for 6bs alone.  At a typical .06 tax rate this would result in about $700,000 of either tax releif or revenue.

That does not count any other incentives in default with the same triennial filing requirement, nor does it count any prior years.   This could extend into the millions with full enforcement.

If regular taxpayers are denied property tax exemptions if they fail to file the proper forms, then  the same standard should be applied to incentive beneficiaries.   The least these recipients can do is fill out a form every three years.  The Assessor should do his job and enforce the ordinance.  Taxpayers can not selectively choose to ignore County ordinances.  The Assesor should not be able to either.

People facing eviction and foreclosure are financially stressed by definition.

Losing one's primary residence is a big deal that can affect one's physical health.

Both the U.S. Constitution and Illinois Constitution guarantee that people will be secure in their homes.

Lenders have too often engaged in fraud and other practices that make foreclosures legally defective. This is in part possible because attorneys that represent lenders and landlords often have a chummy relationship with the judges that hear these cases.

If there's a right to counsel in criminal matters, it doesn't seem like an unusual interpretation of the U.S. Constitution and Illinois Constitution to see a right to counsel in evictions and foreclosures.

This should be paid for by a small tax on home loans, a large fee on foreclosures and a tax on rental units where either the owner has six or more units or the property management company manages six or more units.

There are a huge number of residential properties in Cook County that have been foreclosed upon and remain vacant for long periods after the foreclosure.

This diminishes the communities where there are foreclosed properties. And over time the properties themselves become damaged, sometimes beyond repair.

When a lender forecloses on a property s/he should have six months to return the property to the market. The lender can either rent the property to a tenant or sell it to someone who occupies the property.

If the lender takes greater than six months, Cook County should impose a per month fee on the lender. If the property remains vacant a year after the foreclosure, the fee should go up.

The revenue from these fees/taxes should be split between the school district(s) (largest amount), municipal government and county (smallest amount).

This will generate revenue. It will strengthen communities. And, as the foreclosed properties get repaired, stimulate the economy.